Douglas Creek District

The Douglas Creek district in the central Medicine Bow Mountains includes all placer deposits along Douglas Creek and its tributaries, from Rob Roy Reservoir southward for six miles to below Lake Creek. Gold was discovered in Moore’s Gulch, a tributary of Douglas Creek, by Iram Moore in 1868. Lode gold discoveries in both the New Rambler and Keystone districts resulted from placer gold being traced upstream to its primary sources. Heavy placer activity along the creek included elaborate hydraulic ditches in use by 1876. Resurgent placer activities during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s used gasoline-powered draglines and floating washing plants. Gold recovered from gravels up to 20 feet thick varied from 890 to 960 fine, with some silver and traces of platinum (Hausel, 1989). Currey (1965) estimated total gold production from the Douglas Creek placers at about 4,000 ounces. The Douglas Creek district remains a popular area for continuing small-scale placer mining.

Douglas Creek placer gold, donated to the WSGS by Paul Allred.
Douglas Creek placer gold, donated
to the WSGS by Paul Allred.